Loading…
for BUDSC17
Attending this event?
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Friday, October 6
 

3:30pm

Registration
Registration will take place on the 2nd floor of the Elaine Langone Center (ELC) on the uphill side of the building. Please follow signs to registration posted in the ELC.

Friday October 6, 2017 3:30pm - 6:30pm
Elaine Langone Center

4:00pm

Campus Tour
Join us for a tour of campus. If you plan on attending the tour, please email Matt Gardzina, Director of Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship, (mkg013 at bucknell dot edu) to confirm. The tour will begin promptly at 4PM. 

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Gardzina

Matthew Gardzina

Director, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship, Bucknell University
Matt is responsible for providing leadership, direction, planning, and oversight for the wide-range of outreach, consultation, instruction and support programs of the Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship team. A native of the Berkshires in Western Massachusetts, Matt came to Bucknell from The College of Wooster where he served as the Director of Instructional Technology... Read More →


Friday October 6, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:30pm

Opening Reception
Join us for an opening reception in the Samek Art Museum.

Friday October 6, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Samek Art Museum

6:30pm

Dinner and Keynote Address
#kn1

A.D. Carson
is a performance artist and educator from Decatur, Illinois. He received his Ph.D. in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design at Clemson University doing work that focuses on race, literature, history, and rhetorical performances. Through his See the Stripes campaign, which takes its name from his 2014 poem, Carson has worked with Clemson students, faculty, staff, and community members to raise awareness of historic and entrenched racism at the university. He is an award-winning artist with essays, music, and poetry published at a variety of diverse venues such as The Guardian, Quiddity International Literary Journal and Public-Radio Program, and Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory, among others. His essay “Trimalchio from Chicago: Flashing Lights and the Great Kanye in West Egg” appears in The Cultural Impact of Kanye West (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), and “Oedipus—Not So Complex: A Blueprint for Literary Education” is published in Jay-Z: Essays on Hip Hop’s Philosopher King (McFarland & Co., 2011). He has written a novel, COLD, which hybridizes poetry, rap lyrics, and prose, and The City: [un]poems, thoughts, rhymes & miscellany, a collection of poems, short stories, and essays. Carson is a 2016 recipient of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award for Excellence in Service at Clemson University. Carson is currently assistant professor in Hip-Hop and the Global South in the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter/IG @aydeethegreat.

Speakers
avatar for A.D. Carson

A.D. Carson

University of Virginia
A.D. Carson is a performance artist and educator from Decatur, Illinois. He received his Ph.D. in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design at Clemson University doing work that focuses on race, literature, history, and rhetorical performances. Through his See the Stripes... Read More →


Friday October 6, 2017 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Terrace Room
 
Saturday, October 7
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Saturday October 7, 2017 7:30am - 8:45am
Terrace Room

9:00am

Morning Keynote Address

What happens when massive computing power brings together an ever-growing cross-section of the world’s information in realtime, from news media to social media, books to academic literature, the world’s libraries to the web itself, machine translates all of that material as it arrives, and applies a vast array of algorithms to identify the events and emotions, actors and narratives and their myriad connections that define the planet to create a living silicon replica of global society? The GDELT Project (http://gdeltproject.org/), supported by Alphabet’s Jigsaw (formerly Google Ideas), is the largest open data initiative in the world focusing on cataloging and modeling global human society, offering a first glimpse at what this emerging “big data” understanding of society looks like.  Operating the world’s largest open deployments of streaming machine translation, sentiment analysis, geocoding, image analysis and event identification, coupled with perhaps the world’s largest program to catalog local media, the GDELT Project monitors worldwide news media, emphasizing small local outlets, live machine translating all coverage it monitors in 65 languages, flagging mentions of people and organizations, cataloging relevant imagery, video, and social posts, converting textual mentions of location to mappable geographic coordinates, identifying millions of themes and thousands of emotions, extracting over 300 categories of physical events, collaborating with the Internet Archive to preserve online news and making all of this available in a free open data firehose of human society.  This is coupled with a massive socio-cultural contextualization dataset codified from more than 21 billion words of academic literature spanning most unclassified US Government publications, the open web, and more than 2,200 journals representing the majority of humanities and social sciences research on Africa and the Middle East over the last half century. The world’s largest open deep learning image cataloging initiative, totaling more than a quarter billion images, inventories the world’s news imagery in realtime, identifying the objects, activities, locations, words and emotions defining the world’s myriad visual narratives and allowing them for the first time to be explored alongside traditional textual narratives. Used by governments, NGOs, scholars, journalists, and ordinary citizens across the world to identify breaking situations, map evolving conflicts, model the undercurrents of unrest, explore the flow of ideas and narratives across borders, and even forecast future unrest, the GDELT Project constructs a realtime global catalog of behavior and beliefs across every country, connecting the world’s information into a single massive ever-evolving realtime network capturing what's happening around the world, what its context is and who's involved, and how the world is feeling about it, every single day. Here’s what it looks like to conduct data analytics at a truly planetary scale and the incredible new insights we gain about the daily heartbeat of our global world and what we can learn about the role of libraries in our big data future.

 


Speakers
avatar for Kalev Leetaru

Kalev Leetaru

Senior Fellow, Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, Georgetown University
One of Foreign Policy Magazine's Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2013, Kalev is a Senior Fellow at the George Washington University Center for Cyber & Homeland Security and a member of its Counterterrorism and Intelligence Task Force, as well as being a 2015-2016 Google Developer Expert for Google Cloud Platform. From 2013-2014 he was the Yahoo! Fellow in Residence of International Values, Communications Technology... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Forum

10:15am

Break
Saturday October 7, 2017 10:15am - 10:30am
TBA

10:30am

Evolving the Library and Scholarly Environments
Crawling the Library Dungeon
Megan Kudzia (Michigan State University) and Greg Lord (Hamilton College)

Come hear about the cross-institutional, cross-departmental development of a library dungeon-crawler game that blends the physical and the digital. After an overview of the goals and outcomes for players and the game design choices, we’ll discuss the development areas we’re still struggling with and how we’ve begun to solve them. In particular, we’ll explore ways we’re trying to make the game accessible, and how to make setting it up replicable for other institutions. We’ll talk about how we plan to assess the game’s effectiveness. Finally, we’ll do an interactive modified demo of the game’s opening moves.


Evolution via Devolution? Lewis & Clark’s Digital Scholarship Multisite, 2014-2020
Jim Proctor (Lewis & Clark College)

Building on previous experience with WordPress-based student scholarship, Lewis & Clark’s Environmental Studies Program launched an ambitious digital scholarship multisite, ds.lclark.edu, in 2014, intending to fully share it with other academic programs on campus. Now three years and some 250 sites later, ds.lclark.edu has made important gains but still struggles to be well supported and broadly implemented. How do we, and similar initiatives on other campuses, achieve these elusive goals? One partial solution involves devolution: rather than fully rely on centralized technical and training assistance, we are helping students, staff, and faculty gain mid-level skills so as to serve their own program’s needs and provide training and support to their peers. While we continue to pursue possibilities for college-wide support, this devolutionary approach may best serve our students in the foreseeable future. The talk will briefly recount our past and likely future steps in this direction.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Kudzia

Megan Kudzia

Megan Kudzia is the Digital Scholarship Technology Librarian at Michigan State University. She works with students, faculty, and colleagues in the library to work on, consult about, and teach with digital scholarship and digital projects. This includes working with the LEADR lab... Read More →
GL

Greg Lord

Greg Lord is Lead Designer and Software Engineer of the Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) at Hamilton College, developing a range of technologies for DHi’s digital research projects including graphic design, web development, 3D modeling, and virtual reality design.   A lifelong gaming enthusiast, Greg works with... Read More →
avatar for Jim Proctor

Jim Proctor

Professor, Lewis & Clark College
Jim Proctor serves as Professor and Director of the Environmental Studies Program at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. His research as a geographer includes environmental theory, interdisciplinarity, and new learning technologies, with work in the latter ranging from con... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 241

10:30am

Exploring Digitized Texts

Textual Analysis for Actors in a Shakespearean Theater Troupe
Beth Seltzer (Bryn Mawr College)

What does the digital have to offer to the public? This project is an experiment examining the usefulness of computer-assisted textual analysis in the context of a community theater troupe putting on an original-practices production of Love’s Labour’s Lost. In the Shakespeare in the Summer version of original practices, actors are expected to analyze the text's rhetoric on their own and improvise blocking, with no director or rehearsal. I provide each actor with textual analysis of their lines, using multiple methods: sentiment analysis, stylometry, and word collocation. I use their responses to discover which methods are the most useful and compelling to them in the process of preparing for the show, and to speculate on what digital scholarship might ideally offer publics engaged in literary interpretation.

From Coding to Curating: A Decade of Building Tools for Close Reading of Digitized Texts
Mark D. LeBlanc and Kate Boylan (Wheaton College)

Over the last decade, the Lexomics Research Group has leveraged interdisciplinary teaching and research to build a series of tools to help scholars explore digitized texts. What began as a very focused scholarly question about an Old English text has led to an innovative research group with undergraduates, sets of “connected” courses, and Lexos: a simple, web-based workflow for text processing, statistical analysis, and visualization designed to address barriers of entry to computer-assisted explorations of texts. Yet, as more scholars and students across the academy engage in computational explorations of texts, we submit that a more intentional curation of digital assets for scholars is increasingly needed. Our evolution brings us (back) to the library seeking expertise with ways of storing digitized texts in various states (e.g., raw, cleaned, and/or segmented), caching preliminary, negative, and final tries, and how best to support the dissemination and reproducibility of results.


100 Years in the Making: A Case for Books in Curricular Digital Scholarship (Scalar, Tensor and Crossroads)

Christopher Gilman, Jacob Alden Sargent, and Craig Dietrich (Occidental College)

Occidental College (Oxy) has been working to develop curriculum and technical infrastructure for sharing curated archival and undergraduate research projects between educational and cultural heritage institutions. This session presents a case study of a pilot undergraduate course in the humanities which deployed the digital scholarly authoring platform Scalar as a means to engage a collection of Russian Avant-garde artist books housed at the Getty Research Institute (GRI). The session will feature a live demonstration of a new middleware tool, Tensor, which has an iTunes-like interface for collecting and migrating content between digital archives and publishing platforms. Tensor will bridge Scalar, as long-form online scholarly publication platform, with Global Crossroads, Oxy’s short-form site-based presentation system, placing these systems in close proximity to each other as a new, open-source and modular system for facilitating and disseminating digital scholarship.


Speakers
avatar for Kate Boylan

Kate Boylan

Director, Archives & Digital Initiatives, Wheaton College
Kate Boylan is Digital Initiatives Librarian at Wheaton College (Norton, MA) where she is charged with curating, preserving and disseminating Wheaton’s unique digital scholarship and assets.
CD

Craig Dietrich

Craig Dietrich, a digital artist, scholar, and educator, is Mellon Research Associate at Occidental College. With the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, he is the co-creator of Scalar, a semantic web scholarly digital authoring tool, and the creator of Tensor, a new middlewa... Read More →
CG

Christopher Gilman

Occidental College
Chris Gilman is Associate Director for Design + Development in the Center for Digital Liberal Arts, and Affiliated Faculty in Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture at Occidental College. He has a PhD in Slavic languages and literatures and a BA in Russian studies. His pro... Read More →
avatar for Mark D. LeBlanc

Mark D. LeBlanc

Professor of Computer Science, Wheaton College
Mark D. LeBlanc is Professor of Computer Science at Wheaton College (Norton, MA) where he has taught and conducted research with undergraduates for over 20 years. LeBlanc pioneered a number of interdisciplinary research and teaching efforts, including the Lexomics Research Group... Read More →
JA

Jacob Alden Sargent

Occidental College
Jacob Alden Sargent is an Associate Director for Instruction and Research in the Center for Digital Liberal Arts at Occidental College.
BS

Beth Seltzer

Bryn Mawr College
Beth Seltzer is the Educational Technology Specialist at Bryn Mawr College, where she works on a range of initiatives designed to integrate technology into a small liberal arts college environment. Current projects include the Blended Learning in the Liberal Arts Initiative, the... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Center Room

10:30am

Finding Herstory: Digital Methods in Archival Research
Visualizing "College Women"
Alicia Peaker, Stella Fritzell, Nathália Santos, Madeline Perry, Claudia Zavala, and Mimi Benkoussa (Bryn Mawr College)

This summer, the inaugural group of Digital Scholarship Summer Fellows collaborated with members of Bryn Mawr’s Special Collections and Digital Scholarship program to produce an accessible and interactive data visualization project that offers new entryways into the collections exposed in the College Women (https://www.collegewomen.org/) project.


A Data First Approach  (Then Retreat, Then Regroup, Then Approach Again)  to a Collaborative Digital Project

Scott Ziegler (American Philosophical Society Library)

“In Her Own Right: Women Asserting Their Civil Rights, 1820-1920” is an NEH-funded pilot project to identify, scan, and present online items in libraries in the greater Philadelphia area relating to the struggle for women’s rights.

The technical working group for the project was tasked with identifying a suitable digital infrastructure to showcase the material. They did that. Then they complicated matters by also prioritizing a data-first approach the project.

This presentation is the perspective of one member of the technical working group, and will detail the decision to build data exports and APIs in addition to a user interface. There have been false starts, changed plans, and periods of self-doubt. This ongoing project is a case study in collaborative digitization projects from a data first perspective, the evaluation of library-supplied data, engaging user participation for data enhancement, and the practicalities of implementing user-supplied data.


Speakers
DG

Daniel G. Kipnis

Daniel G. Kipnis, MSI, is a Senior Education Librarian and Editor of the Jefferson Digital Commons at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia Pennsylvania. He has worked in Academic Health Science libraries for 18 years and has been the Editor of the Jefferson Digital Commons since 2008... Read More →
avatar for Alicia Peaker

Alicia Peaker

Digital Scholarship Specialist, Bryn Mawr College
Alicia Peaker is the Digital Scholarship Specialist at Bryn Mawr College and Director of the Digital Scholarship Summer Fellows program. She has worked previously as the CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellow in the Digital Liberal Arts at Middlebury College; the Co-Director for Our Marath... Read More →
avatar for Scott Ziegler

Scott Ziegler

Head of Technology, American Philosophical Society
Scott Ziegler is the Head of Technology at the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia, Pa. He manages the digital scholarship initiatives as well as well as the digital humanities fellowship program. He served on the Technical Working Group for the NEH-funded proj... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Walls Lounge

12:00pm

Lunch and Afternoon Keynote Address

Stephen Cartwright’s work exists at the confluence of science and art, where hard data intersects with the intangible complexities of human experience. Since 1999 he has recorded his exact latitude, longitude and elevation every hour of every day. Cartwright incorporates his location data and other personally recorded information into his digital and sculptural work. In addition to his latitude and longitude recordings, recent work focuses on constructing landscapes and forms, and analyzing correlations from other self-recorded data.  

Stephen Cartwright was born in State College, Pennsylvania in 1972. Cartwright earned a BA in Studio Art from the University of California, Davis and an MFA in Sculpture from Tyler School of Art in 1998. In 2008 he joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is now an associate professor in the School of Art and Design. 

Cartwright has exhibited widely throughout the United States. Recent exhibitions include: Machine Wilderness - The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History; Machinations: Kinetic Sculpture in the Age of Open Source - Columbia College Chicago; Crooked Data: (Mis)information in  Contemporary Art - University of Richmond; Human Trajectory - Fermilab National Laboratory. He also frequently discusses his practice at events and academic conferences, recent speaking engagements include: The Quantified Self Conference; The North American Cartographic Information Society Annual Meeting; College Art Association Annual Conference.


Speakers
avatar for Stephen Cartwright

Stephen Cartwright

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Stephen Cartwright’s work exists at the confluence of science and art, where hard data intersects with the intangible complexities of human experience. Since 1999 he has recorded his exact latitude, longitude and elevation every hour of every day. Cartwright incorporates his location data and other personally recorded information into his digital and sculptural work. In addition to his latitude and longitude recordings, recent work focuses on constructing landscapes and forms, and analyzing correlations from other self-recorded data. | | Stephen Cartwright was born in State College, Pennsylvania in 1972. Cartwright earned a BA in Studio Art from the University of California, Davis and an MFA in Sculpture from Tyler School of Art in 1998. In 2008 he joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is now an associate professor in the School of Art and Design. Cartwright has exhibited widely throughout the United States. Recent exhibitions include: Machine Wilderness - The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History; Machinations: Kinetic Sculpture in the Age of Open Source - Columbia College Chicago; Crooked Data: (Mis)information... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Terrace Room

1:45pm

Beyond Text: Digital Approaches to Pedagogy and Scholarship

The Evolution of Wooster's Independent Study
Jon Breitenbucher (The College of Wooster)

The College of Wooster established the Senior Independent Study project in 1947 under President Howard Lowry. Until relatively recently the majority of projects outside of the performance and studio arts have been written theses. A typical student would produce an 80-200 page written document that would be bound and submitted to the Registrar to archive. In the last 10 years this has started to change. First we had students creating documentary films for their Independent Study projects in English, then students creating website interactive digital texts and now we find our students wanting to creating fully immersive virtual experiences. Our presentation will explore the ways Educational Technologists and Digital Scholars have influenced and support this evolution.

Film-Media Analysis Using Digital Tools: Innovation as Shameless Appropriation
John Hunter (Bucknell University)

This presentation shows how the ELAN suite of tools (free software developed by and for linguists) can be a wonderful pedagogic and scholarly tool for close-reading films, TV shows, and any other moving-image media. Using specific examples from film scholarship and classroom experience, it shows how the kind of fine-grained analysis that has long been possible for written texts is now possible for film/media studies. It ends with suggested uses in a variety of scholarly and pedagogic contexts.

Researching Videos about Islam and Science:  A Methodology for Finding and Cataloguing Cultural Elements on the Web

Vika Gardner (Hampshire College)

Internet videos sometimes present slices of highly coded information, including views that the curator wants to be normative.  Videos that present science narratives combined with representations of Islam or Muslims often construct what Muslims believe about science.  The prior literature examining videos discussing Islam use only YouTube videos, although there has been censorship of this video platform from Muslim-dominated countries like Turkey and Pakistan.  Thus in order to survey all Muslims’ views, one must also examine other video platforms as well.


To gain a better understanding of videos on science and Islam, we catalogued videos on any platform that address natural science and Islam.  This presentation discusses the methodologies we used and the rationales behind the choices we made, including important terms that we found needed to be defined.  The data collected formed the basis for the Science and Islam Video Portal, www.scienceandislamvideos.com, which presents videos with academic evaluations addressing religion, science and history.

 


Speakers
JB

Jon Breitenbucher

The College of Wooster
Dr. Jon Breitenbucher holds a Ph. D in mathematics from The Ohio State University. He has been involved with educational technology in some from since 2001 helping establish The College of Wooster's Moodle and WordPress multisite platforms in the mid-2000s. He is always looking f... Read More →
avatar for Vika Gardner

Vika Gardner

Research fellow, Center for the Study of Science in Muslim Societies, Hampshire College
I work at the intersection of a variety of fields. My PhD is in Islamic studies, working on Central Asia in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Currently I am working on contemporary presentations of science and Islam on video, which has combined my interests in science, med... Read More →
avatar for John Hunter

John Hunter

Associate Professor of Comparative Humanities, Bucknell University
John Hunter teaches in the Comparative Humanities Program and is Acting Director of the Film/Media Studies Program at Bucknell University. His current scholarly project is developing an online searchable database of feature films.


Saturday October 7, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Center Room

1:45pm

How Much will this Place Cost? Creating and Maintaining Digital Scholarship Centers
The mushrooming of digital scholarship programs and centers in universities around the country and the world has led to a growing literature on the use of physical and virtual spaces in support of digital work. In this open-ended discussion a group of professionals who oversee digital scholarship centers (DSCs) will offer insights into the process of forming functional DS spaces, including discussion of constructive failures in DSC planning. Participation in the discussion by all attendees is welcome and encouraged.

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Tolbert

Jeff Tolbert

Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Scholarship, Bucknell University
Digital scholarship, digital ethnography, digital folkloristics.

Speakers
ED

Eric D. M. Johnson

Head, Innovative Media | Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries
DJ

Daniel Johnson

English and Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Notre Dame
avatar for Joan Lippincott

Joan Lippincott

Associate Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
LM

Liz Milewicz

Head, Digital Scholarship Services Department, Duke University
RW

Rob Weidman

Digital Library Technical Coordinator
avatar for Mike Zarafonetis

Mike Zarafonetis

Coordinator for Digital Scholarship and Services, Haverford College


Saturday October 7, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Walls Lounge

1:45pm

Project Planning for Data Management and Digital Scholarship

Research Data Then and Now: Snapshots of Data Management Practices
Megan Sheffield, Anne Grant, Renna Redd (Clemson University), and Maggie Albro (Shippensburg University)

Clemson University began planning new data services through the library in 2012 with an environmental scan in the form of an online survey sent to all CU researchers. Due to unexpected turnover and administrative changes, the survey results were not acted upon immediately, and in 2013 many granting agencies started to implement new policies. As a result, CU Libraries decided to offer the survey again in 2016; many questions were left unchanged. This gave the data services team a unique data set that showed clear changes in the way a group of researchers approached digital scholarship in 2016 versus 2012. This data will be used at Clemson University to plan and implement new data services; the information gathered by comparing the two sets of survey results will be useful to other information professionals that are seeking clarity on changing attitudes about data sharing and data management.


The Sun Never Sets on Project Planning: Doing a Digital Project in a Traditional World
Trina Marmarelli and Angie Beiriger (Reed College)

Since November 2012, with generous support from the W.M. Keck Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Reed College’s department of computing and information services and its library have been working together with faculty members on a project aimed at increasing students’ capacity to engage with digital sources and tools as integral components of the research process. Our session will provide an overview of the project’s goals and how they have been realized through our course-based collaborations; we will then turn to a more focused case study of one new course, “Migration Histories in the British Imperial World,” that was taught at Reed in spring 2017 after almost two years of collaborative planning and design. In this interactive session, we will discuss the successes and challenges of this course and of our collaborative digital scholarship projects in general.


Speakers
avatar for Angie Beiriger

Angie Beiriger

Humanities and Digital Scholarship Librarian, Reed College
As Humanities & Digital Scholarship Librarian, I support the development of digital scholarship projects across campus by assisting with research, instruction, preservation, and metadata. I manage digital scholarship content in Reed Digital Collections, our campus digital assets... Read More →
avatar for Trina Marmarelli

Trina Marmarelli

Director of Instructional Technology Services, Reed College
Trina Marmarelli is director of instructional technology services at Reed College. Her team supports faculty and students in selecting and using digital tools and methods for teaching, learning, and research. During her time at Reed, Trina has been involved in projects ranging fr... Read More →
avatar for Megan Sheffield

Megan Sheffield

E-Science Librarian, Clemson University
Megan Sheffield is the Life Sciences and Data Services Librarian at Clemson University Libraries. Maggie Albro is the STEM Librarian at Shippensburg University. Anne Grant is the instruction coordinator at Clemson University Libraries. Renna Redd is the InterLibrary Loan Libraria... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Room 241

3:15pm

Break
Saturday October 7, 2017 3:15pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

Instruction, Rhetorics, and Scholarship

The Evolving Language of Conscious Capitalism

Drew Hess and Cassidy Fuller (Washington and Lee University)

What is the purpose of a commercial enterprise?  While many (or most) still follow the ‘make money for shareholders’ paradigm, there are an increasing number of businesses and scholars who have embraced the idea that businesses have a corporate social responsibility (“CSR”) to their stakeholders.  The push for organizations to embrace their obligations to the broader community, so called, “Conscious Capitalism” movement is fairly nascent in the US.  Indeed, over the last 20 years in the US, corporate social responsibility has gone from an afterthought to a necessary part of a company’s core business. Our research project investigates the evolution of the language companies have used to describe their CSR efforts to their stakeholders. We are hypothesizing that we will find that this language has evolved over time to reflect CSR's increasing importance to the mission of the organization.

Harnessing Anchored Instruction, Connectivism, and Mentoring to Develop Liberal Arts Faculty in Blended Learning Modalities
Jeff Kissinger, Jeremy Hillpot (Rollins College), and Rui Cao (Schreiner University)

Through a mentoring model and teaching through narrative, liberal arts language faculty learned via online professional development how to teach online language courses with evidence-based methods and humanizing learning technologies like VoiceThread. 


Speakers
CF

Cassidy Fuller

Cassidy Fuller is a junior at Washington and Lee University from Orinda, California. At school, she is a Business Administrations major, managing editor of the school newspaper, The Ring Tum Phi, serves on PanHellenic Council as Head Rho Gamma, and she is a member of the swim tea... Read More →
DH

Drew Hess

Professor Hess researches and teaches in entrepreneurship and strategy. His teaching interests include social and practical entrepreneurship, as well as business and corporate strategy. In his research, he uses empirical methods to measure and analyze the role the individual plays in facilitating organizational innovation. Prior to joining... Read More →
JK

Jeff Kissinger

Jeff Kissinger is a director in Academic Services and Products at Academic Partnerships.    | | Most of Jeff's professional life has been immersed in higher education, faculty mentoring, online administration and program development.  In addition, he has continued to teach online for the last 15 years... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Center Room

3:30pm

Navigating Digital Scholarship Programs for/by Undergraduates
Successes and Challenges in Growing and Sustaining an Undergraduate Digital Scholarship Program
R.C. Miessler (Gettysburg College)

In July of 2017, Gettysburg College’s Musselman Library completed the second iteration of the Digital Scholarship Summer Fellowship, a library-led, student-focused program that introduces students to digital scholarship tools and methodology. With the 2017 cohort, the program maintained many of its key features that made it successful, such as its curriculum, presenting a final project, and fostering a community of digital scholarship practice among undergraduates.

With a desire to expand the program, the second iteration of the program evolved to incorporate the 2016 cohort of Digital Scholarship Fellows; these students, who provided digital scholarship support to students and faculty during the academic year, returned as Senior Fellows and acted as mentors to the 2017 cohort, developed an open educational resource, and continued their own research projects.
Librarian R.C. Miessler will discuss the successes and challenges of supporting a growing digital scholarship program, with a focus on its future sustainability and a vision of its expansion into a campus-wide initiative.



Speakers
avatar for R.C. Miessler

R.C. Miessler

Systems Librarian, Gettysburg College
R.C. Miessler is the Systems Librarian at Gettysburg College’s Musselman Library and chair of the library’s Digital Scholarship Committee. A lifelong geek in all things religion and technology, he’s interested in how students and faculty can use technology to present and interpre... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Walls Lounge

3:30pm

Students and Digital Text: New Approaches in Classroom
Introducing Students to Explorations of Digitized Texts Using Lexos
Mark LeBlanc (Wheaton College)

The rapid digitization of texts presents both new opportunities and real barriers of entry to computer-assisted explorations of texts for both faculty and students. Computer science programs, especially those on liberal arts campuses, are well positioned to help faculty and students across the humanities (and social sciences) who seek to apply computational techniques to their digitized corpora of interest. This workshop provides hands-on practice with a set of web-based tools and a review of tested interdisciplinary course materials that support efforts for your campus to bring novel applications of computation to digitized texts in domains across the academy.

Speakers
avatar for Mark D. LeBlanc

Mark D. LeBlanc

Professor of Computer Science, Wheaton College
Mark D. LeBlanc is Professor of Computer Science at Wheaton College (Norton, MA) where he has taught and conducted research with undergraduates for over 20 years. LeBlanc pioneered a number of interdisciplinary research and teaching efforts, including the Lexomics Research Group... Read More →


Saturday October 7, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 241

5:00pm

Cocktail Hour, Poster and Digital Demonstration Session
Writing Center + Library = Digital Writing Interdisciplinary Faculty Development
Neal Baker and Laura Leavitt (Earlham College)

Building a Digital Materials Repository for History 201, ‘Introduction to Historical GIS.’
Ethan Pepin and David Del Testa (Bucknell University)

Sustaining Marginal Communities in the Face of Gentrification and Mass Incarceration
Vanessa Massaro and Sarah Sulkowski (Bucknell University)

Documenting Offshore Oil Development: Digitizing, Organizing, and Analyzing Archival Materials Relating to the First Offshore Oil Well in the North American Arctic, 1972-1976
Andrew Stuhl and Ashley Vecchio (Bucknell University)

Digital or Analog? Tools for Visualization of Surfaces in Multivariable Calculus
Nathan Ryan and Angel Bautista (Bucknell University)

The Power of Mapping: Applications of GIS in Disaster Resilience and Planning
Corrie Walton-McCauley and Patrick Yang (Bucknell University)

Economic Mobility in the United States: An Examination of Upward Mobility, Through the Lens of Geography, Race, Gender, Class, and Access to Higher Education
Jan Knoedler, Autumn Patterson, and Emily Tevebaugh (Bucknell University)

Behind Hockey's Stars: A Statistical Analysis of Critical Hockey Team Metrics
Rennie Heza (Bucknell University)

Virtual Reality and Ernst Haeckle
Joe Meiser (Bucknell University)

China's Internet Wave
Minglu Xu (Bucknell University)

LGBTQ+ Representation in Cinema
Justin Guzman (Bucknell University)


Speakers
NB

Neal Baker

Neal Baker is the Library Director at Earlham College, where the librarians also serve as academic technologists. He teaches first-year seminars in the curriculum and publishes scholarship on both libraries and various aspects of the SF/fantasy genres. Current professional servic... Read More →
JG

Justin Guzman

Environmental
Justin Guzman is a rising Junior majoring in Film & Media Studies. He lives in Brooklyn, New York and is of Latinx descent. He currently works as a videographer, photographer, and graphic designer for Bucknell organizations such as Uptown and ACE (Activities & Campus Events). He... Read More →
RH

Rennie Heza

Rennie Heza is a rising senior at Bucknell University, with a major in Applied Mathematics and a minor in Russian Language. This summer, Rennie will be conducting performance analysis of NHL teams during the 2016-17 regular season, focussing on ties between team performance and managerial decisions. Rennie is the team statistician for... Read More →
JK

Jan Knoedler

Academic Co-Coordinator & Senior Fellow, Society & Technology
LL

Laura Leavitt

Laura Leavitt is the Writing Center Director at Earlham College. She teaches supplementary writing education classes for students entering college with low writing confidence or for students who have learned English as a foreign language. She also participates in faculty developm... Read More →
JM

Joe Meiser

Joe Meiser is Associate Professor of Art at Bucknell University
XM

Xu Minglu

Languages & Cultures
Minglu is a sophomore at Bucknell University, majoring in Economics and possibly minoring in Mathematics and Philosophy.
AS

Andrew Stuhl

Bucknell University
DD

David Del Testa

Associate Professor, Bucknell University
Cooking. Beverages. Travel. Food. Restaurants. Movies, a little. Teaching, especially about undergraduate research. Vietnam. France. The West.
ET

Emily Tevebaugh

Junior Fellow, Humanities
AV

Ashley Vecchio

Environmental
avatar for Corrie Walton-Macaulay

Corrie Walton-Macaulay

Assistant Professor, Bucknell University
Corrie Walton-Macaulay is an Assistant Professor at Bucknell University in Lewisburg Pennsylvania. He works with undergraduate students in the use of digital technology in transportation infrastructure resiliency. More specifically, a resiliency to natural and targeted events.


Saturday October 7, 2017 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Terrace Room
 
Sunday, October 8
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Sunday October 8, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Terrace Room

8:30am

Digital Public Scholarship and Institutional Respositories

Building Southsider: Digital Public Humanities Project at Lehigh University Collaborates with Community Partners to Celebrate Art and Civic Engagement

Mary C. Foltz, James McAdams, and Adam Heidebrink-Bruno (Lehigh University)


In 2016, Lehigh University’s South Side Initiative received a Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative Grant to launch a collaborative website to reflect upon, analyze, and celebrate the vibrant local arts scene on the South Side of Bethlehem, PA.  With a group of undergraduate writers, graduate student managing editors, community partners, and a faculty advisor, our website, Southsider (www.thesouthsider.org), has offered a succession  of articles about film series at our local Arts Cinema, theatrical productions at Touchstone Theatre, visual arts and artists associated with the nonprofit Arts Establishment and other organizations, and musical performances in the live music listening room of Godfrey Daniels. “Building Southsider” will reflect upon the mentorship and training of undergraduate and graduate student reporters as well as collaborations with community partners to produce accessible scholarly reportage that examines how the arts shape our unique civic identity and address the challenges within our communities.


University-Community Engagement:  How Digital Scholarship Can (and Should) Move From the Classroom to the Community
Sabina Deitrick (University of Pittsburgh)

Students at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs have worked to promote the use of digital governance for Pennsylvania’s local communities through Capstone seminars. Building on knowledge from previous years, the Spring 2017 Capstone Seminar on Digital Governance made recommendations to Pennsylvania's State Planning Board, with concrete proposals for state leadership to help local governments, especially smaller communities, incorporate digital applications. The premise of this work is that digital technologies present opportunities for local governments to improve service delivery, and our graduate students in public administration have digital expertise to lend to these communities. Digital scholarship here represents a university-community partnership, as students work with communities to understand how digital tools can help municipalities operate more efficiently, effectively, and equitably.

Collecting qualitative feedback for an institutional repository to help demonstrate value to stakeholders
Daniel G. Kipnis (Thomas Jefferson University)

Librarians love statistics and numbers tell a concrete story, but do not reflect an entire story. To help promote the Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC) the Institutional Repository at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia Pennsylvania, we have made it easy to gather feedback from researchers from around the globe.  We have then taken their feedback and posted it on our homepage. I will describe the workflow on how we have gathered feedback, lessons learned in gathering the feedback, share some feedback and demonstrate how the feedback is shared with stakeholders.

 

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Deitrick

Sabina Deitrick

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues of transition and transformation in post-industrial cities and regions... Read More →
MC

Mary C. Foltz

Lehigh University
Mary C. Foltz is an Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University.
AH

Adam Heidebrink-Bruno

Adam Heidebrink-Bruno is an M.A. student at Lehigh University.
DG

Daniel G. Kipnis

Daniel G. Kipnis, MSI, is a Senior Education Librarian and Editor of the Jefferson Digital Commons at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia Pennsylvania. He has worked in Academic Health Science libraries for 18 years and has been the Editor of the Jefferson Digital Commons since 2008... Read More →
JM

James McAdams

James McAdams is a Visiting Digital Fellow at the University of South Florida.


Sunday October 8, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Walls Lounge

8:30am

From the Ground Up: Digital Approaches to the Ancient Past
From the Ground Up: Digital Approaches to the Ancient Past
Lindsey Mazurek (Bucknell University), R. Benjamin Gorham (University of Virginia), and Daniel P. Diffendale (University of Michigan)

In this panel discussion, we examine how digital approaches are reshaping classical studies, archaeology, and history. Because scholars of the ancient Mediterranean work with incomplete data sets ravaged by time, we are increasingly employing digital approaches to reconstruct lost information and open up new areas of research. In social history, data visualization and textual analysis allow us to reconstruct more dynamic and unstable networks and grapple more complexly with questions of social agency and influence. For classical archaeologists, digital approaches allow us not only to preserve archaeological information, but also to pursue new avenues for publication, dissemination, and collaboration. By bringing together scholars working in both areas, we will examine (1) how digital approaches are changing the ways we think about antiquity, (2) how scholars can use digital tools responsibly to address gaps in and present our evidence from ongoing excavations, and (3) how digital approaches are fostering new connections between classicists and their colleagues in the humanities and STEM fields.

Speakers
DP

Daniel P. Diffendale

Daniel P. Diffendale is a classical archaeologist who specializes in the early history of ancient Rome. He completed his Ph.D. in the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art & Archaeology at the University of Michigan, and has published on religious practices and early state f... Read More →
RB

R. Benjamin Gorham

R. Benjamin Gorham is a Ph.D. Candidate and John H. Birdsall III Fellow in Art and Architectural History at the University of Virginia. Ben specializes in digital archaeology and new implementations of GIS for field research. He works on digital operations for several projects in... Read More →


Sunday October 8, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 241

8:30am

Hardware/Software and other Forms of Scholarship
A Commodore in the Library? Retro Tech as Digital Scholarship “Special Collections”
Daniel Johnson, Alex Papson (University of Notre Dame)

Digital scholarship generates such excitement, that the physical equipment used to produce it is often taken for granted. Insofar as this neglect signals lowered barriers to computer access it is a positive development. However, as media scholars have argued, material circumstances shape cultural production, and computation is no exception. Unless an understanding of earlier technologies is preserved, students and researchers will lose an important part of the story that their data can tell. “A Commodore in the Library?” explores how academic libraries might provide retro-tech as a service akin to rare books – granting access to older technology in a controlled environment for patrons who need “the real thing.” Early experiences at Notre Dame suggest how even a minimum investment in older media and hardware can yield exciting cross-departmental collaboration. This panel projects an interconnected future by looking squarely to the past.


Speakers
DJ

Daniel Johnson

English and Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Notre Dame
AP

Alex Papson

Alexander Papson is the head of the digital production unit for the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries. He oversees the digitization and digital forensics efforts for the library system. Alex is also the metadata and digital projects librarian and does outreach services... Read More →


Sunday October 8, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Center Room

10:00am

Break
Sunday October 8, 2017 10:00am - 10:15am

10:15am

Preconference Recap
Sunday October 8, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Center Room

10:15am

Collaborative Meaning Making in DS Services

Collaborative Meaning Making in Digital Scholarship Services
Vika Zafrin (Boston University) and Purdom Lindblad (University of Maryland)

Digital scholarly practice has been gathering steam for almost a decade at Boston University, but support for it has only been formalized in the last year and a half — and infrastructure building is ongoing. At University of Maryland, both the support and the scholarly practice are well institutionalized. However different our two institutional contexts are, we and others who support digital scholarship have been tentatively reaching out to each other for conversation.

In particular, for many of us this work is informed by the current U.S. political climate, and by digital humanities' and digital libraries' response to it. We will give a brief overview of ways in which our intersecting fields have engaged with political aspects of knowledge production, then open the floor for conversation about workshop participants' current projects, and begin to collaborate on an online list of useful resources for a socio-politically active framing of our work.


Speakers
PL

Purdom Lindblad

Purdom Lindblad is the Assistant Director of Innovation & Learning at the Maryland Insitute for Technology in the Humanities, MITH. Purdom is broadly interested in the implicit and explicit effort that digital humanities can do for social, cultural, and environmental justice. Applying principles from Feminist Interface Design, Purdom and her... Read More →
VZ

Vika Zafrin

Vika Zafrin is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Boston University. Her interests include anti-colonialist digital collection building, vulnerable archives, open access issues, libraries-IT collaboration in higher ed, and digital preservation.  A digital humanist by training, she... Read More →


Sunday October 8, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 241

10:15am

Making / Hacking
Critical Making in the Digital Liberal Arts
Jacob Alden Sargent and Christopher Gilman (Occidental College)

In this presentation we discuss some of the organizational, logistical and pedagogical challenges to building a diverse, inclusive, and critically-oriented maker-space. We describe how we’ve sustained and expanded the impact of our maker space through a focus on student workers as peer teachers and learners, micro-grant fellowships, and the prototyping of a portfolio and badging directory of skills gained at the studio.

Hacking the Humanities: Organizing a Mentored Hackathon to Stimulate Learning and Experimentation in Digital Scholarship
Ben Daigle (Five Colleges of Ohio), Jacob Heil (College of Wooster), and Debra Andreadis (Denison University)

In the Spring 2017 semester, members of the Five Colleges of Ohio Libraries organized a mentored undergraduate hackathon focused entirely on a corpus of historic newspaper text digitized from the Five Colleges of Ohio Student Newspaper Collection dating back to 1856. This highly collaborative event featured mentors from the faculty of the Five Colleges as well as digital humanities practitioners from outside the colleges. In addition to modeling digital scholarship practices for both students and faculty attendees, these mentors guided teams of students as they worked to produce a variety of final projects that ranged from highly technical data visualizations to digital storytelling examining critical issues of race and cultural appropriation.

Our panel of presenters will share our approach to planning an academic hackathon focused on the digital humanities and our suggestions on how events such as hackathons can be framed appropriately as a credible means of stimulating innovation in digital scholarship on liberal arts campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Debra Andreadis

Debra Andreadis

Library Deputy Director, Denison University
Debra Andreadis is the Deputy Director at Denison University Libraries. She wears many hats, but one of those includes overseeing the Digital Commons site at Denison along with coordinating the digital projects for the library. She is also an active participant in Reference and I... Read More →
avatar for Ben Daigle

Ben Daigle

Associate Director of Consortial Library Systems, Five Colleges of Ohio
Ben Daigle is the Associate Director of Consortial Library Systems for the Five Colleges of Ohio. Ben’s work straddles the traditional boundaries between public and technical services, giving him insight into users’ direct experiences of the library and the technical ability to m... Read More →
CG

Christopher Gilman

Occidental College
Chris Gilman is Associate Director for Design + Development in the Center for Digital Liberal Arts, and Affiliated Faculty in Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture at Occidental College. He has a PhD in Slavic languages and literatures and a BA in Russian studies. His pro... Read More →
avatar for Jacob Heil

Jacob Heil

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Dir. of CoRE, College of Wooster
Jacob Heil is the College of Wooster's Digital Scholarship Librarian and the Director of its Collaborative Research Environment (CoRE). Partnering with library colleagues, faculty, and students, he explores digital methods and modalities for teaching and research. He also collaborates with campus stakeholders to bring a strategic vision for CoRE into focus. Previously, he was the Mellon Digital Scholar for the Ohio Five and a Project Manager for Texas... Read More →
JA

Jacob Alden Sargent

Occidental College
Jacob Alden Sargent is an Associate Director for Instruction and Research in the Center for Digital Liberal Arts at Occidental College.


Sunday October 8, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Walls Lounge